A Homemade Recipe For Ghee

Ghee

Earlier this year the media made a big deal out of butter being healthy, after years of wrongly accusing it of being linked to Heart Disease.  You’ll know what I’m talking about if you saw the June issue of Time magazine that had the words, “Eat Butter” on the cover.  Finally the myth of saturated fat being bad for our health was shattered and hit mainstream.  In the article it explained that consuming saturated fat doesn’t actually lead to heart disease.

Ghee

Ghee

Most people know that HDL is our “good” cholesterol and LDL is our “bad” cholesterol, but what they don’t know is that there are two main types of LDL cholesterol.  There’s a small, dense molecule that is linked to heart disease and a large, fluffy molecule that isn’t.  As Chris Kresser says, the other thing most people don’t know is that LDL and HDL aren’t cholesterol but in fact are proteins that transport cholesterol through the blood.  These proteins also carry other fats including polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and saturated fats.  This means the particles can become oxidized from free radicals, excess carbohydrate consumption as well as consumption of trans fats.  When oxidized they are linked to heart disease.  Both HDL and LDL have different jobs in the body.  According to Jonny Bowden and Stephen Sinatra in their book “The Great Cholesterol Myth” LDL carries cholesterol to the cells that need it, while HDL picks up the excess and carries it back to the liver.

Ghee

Ghee

Cholesterol is so important our liver actually produces most of the cholesterol in our body.  When we eat more cholesterol the liver produces less and when we eat less cholesterol it produces more.  Cholesterol is found in every single cell of our body and is needed to produce our sex hormones, vitamin D and bile acids, which are an important part of digestion.    It’s also important for brain health, the building block for cell structure and is known as an antioxidant.  Liz Wolfe quotes Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride in her book, “Eat The Yolks.”  She says that LDL cholesterol directly binds to and inactivates dangerous bacterial toxins.  She goes on to explained that the bacteria that causes MRSA, a common hospital infection that’s so lethal it can dissolve red blood cells, does not work in the presence of LDL.  That’s a pretty powerful antioxidant if you ask me.

Ghee

Ghee

Butter has been eaten in different cultures for years and is a whole food that’s made from whole milk.   Margarine on the other hand is made in a plant by humans, with chemicals.  When butter is grass fed it’s a great source of vitamin A (antioxidant), D (immune support and bone health), E (antioxidant and heart health) and K2 (heart and bone health) as well as butyric acid (anti-inflammatory).  It is traditionally used in Indian cooking and has a higher smoke point than butter, which makes it great for high heat cooking.  It also has a lovely nutty flavour that can be likened to toasted butter, if you can imagine that.  Basically it makes everything taste good.  The major benefit of ghee over butter is that it removes the milk proteins, casein and lactose, so if you have intolerances or allergies to dairy you can still get the benefits of butter by using ghee instead.

Ghee

Ghee

A Homemade Recipe For Ghee
Recipe Type: Condiment
Author: Richelle Ludwig
Cook time:
Total time:
A dairy free alternative to butter.
Ingredients
  • 454g (1 lb) Butter (preferably grass fed and finished)
Instructions
  1. Put the butter in a pot on the stove on medium heat until it’s fully melted and starting to bubble.
  2. Turn heat down to low for about 25 minutes, making sure it continues to simmer. The milk proteins will begin separating and you’ll get a foamy layer on top and browned bits on the bottom.
  3. Using a small mesh strainer scoop out the top foamy layer and discard.
  4. Line a mesh strainer with cheesecloth to catch the browned bits on the bottom and strain into glass jars.
Notes
I usually use two small mason jars and keep one on the counter as Ghee doesn’t need to be refrigerated. I always store extra in the fridge just in case, but it’s harder to spread when used straight out of the fridge.

 

 



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